Women in the Arts 

 Celebrating the Genius of Women              Orlando, Florida             A 501(c)3 non-profit organizatio

2022 CSA Summer Art School: "Art On The Water"

Welcome! Scroll down to find the lesson for your student age group: Preschool, Kids, Tweens, or Teens. 


Text or email the image or video clip of your completed project. Include your first and last name. 

Email Ms. Maria at womeninthearts@gmail.com 

Text (407) 900-5918‬ 


All projects are due the Saturday they are released or no later than the following Saturday by 10:00 AM EST. The latest recommended time to start the project would be the Friday before the deadline. 


Awards: Participants who complete and submit all projects on time, are eligible to receive a prize at the end of the session.

Lesson No.2 

Released: July 02

Due: July 02-July 09 before 10:00 AM ET.

Preschool

Painting: Sea Otter 

Instructor: Maria Guerrero 

This lesson is recommended for ages 3-5

Parental assistance: Yes


View on mobile

Reference Materials  (also included in the art bin)


Related Media

  • Museum Art-Science Connection: Smithsonian Institute-Sea Otters
  • Library Connection: Search the Library catalog: Sea Otters
  •  

    Kids 

    Sunset, Wave, and Dolphins Painting


    Instructor: Lindsay Merwin

    This lesson is recommended for ages 6-8.

    Parental assistance as needed. 

    Set-Up Supplies
    Plastic table cover
    Paper plates
    A large plastic cup or container with water
    Paper towels/hand wipes
    Wear clothes you don’t mind getting paint on.

    Art Bin Materials

    Canvas
    Acrylic paint set
    Brushes, round and flat

    1

    Starting with your white canvas, paint the bottom half blue. It doesn’t have to be an exact straight line, this is going to be water! It is very important for you to wait until your canvas is completely dry before you move on to step 2!

    2

    Once your blue paint is totally dry, fill in the rest of the white canvas with yellow paint. This is going to be the sunset sky.

    3

    Next we’re going to start adding in the waves. Take a little bit of blue and a little bit of white and mix it together to create a lighter blue. With that lighter blue, start adding dashes and lines all throughout the blue half of your canvas. No two waves are exactly the same, so don’t worry if yours doesn’t match mine perfectly!

    4

    Next, take a little bit of blue and a little bit of yellow & mix them together. What color does that make? Green! Experiment with how little or how much of each color you use when mixing, add more blue to it if the color is too yellow-ish, and vice versa. Now take that color and do the same dashed lines across your painting. The colors can overlap, or you can paint in the gaps, however you want your waves to look!

    5

    To add highlights, paint some dashed lines with white paint.

    6

    Take some yellow paint and mix some red into it, now you have orange! Do the same dashed lines again with the orange, and also do some with the yellow. These will be reflections of the sun. For the sun, use the orange you just made and make a big half circle in the middle of your sky.

    7

    Now for some clouds! What colors do you think sunset clouds would be? In my painting, I used pinks, yellows, oranges, and white. To make pink, mix red paint with a little bit of white. Using your round brush, dab blobs of the pink in the sky in the shape of clouds. Like the waves, no two clouds are the same so you can make them as big or as small or as fluffy as you want! There is no wrong way to paint a cloud!

    8

    Next I used some of the orange I already mixed and added it to the bottom of the pink clouds, the orange acts as a shadow!

    9

    I decided I wanted a bit more pink in the waves, so I took some of the pink I already made and added some more white to it, making it a bit of lighter pink. I used that and added more dashed lines in the waves, and I also added some to the top of the pink clouds I painted so they have some highlights. I also made a lighter yellow to make some more clouds by mixing yellow with some white!

    10

    Now let’s add some dolphins! Using a pencil (just in case you need to erase!) draw two ovals with points on the end over your big orange sun.

    11

    Next you’re going to add another very small oval on the right side of each one, this will be their snouts.

    12

    Now add a small triangle on the top of each one, this is their fin!

    13

    Now add the same triangle shape on the bottom for another fin!

    14

    Next, add another very small oval to the pointed end of your dolphin, this is half of their tail fin.

    15

    Almost done with the dolphins! Add another small oval next to your first tail fin, now you have a full dolphin!

    16.   To finish off your painting, fill in your dolphin drawing with black paint so now you have two dolphin silhouettes!

    Related Media

    Tweens

    Sunset Surfer Painting


    Instructor: Lindsay Merwin

    This lesson is recommended for ages 9-12.

    Parental assistance as needed. 

    Set-Up Supplies
    Plastic table cover
    Paper plates
    A large plastic cup or container with water
    Paper towels/hand wipes
    Wear clothes you don’t mind getting paint on.

    Art Bin Materials
    Canvas
    Acrylic paint set
    Brushes, round and flat
     

    1

    Start by mixing some yellow paint with some red to make orange. With your white canvas, paint the bottom half orange. It doesn’t have to be an exact straight line, this is going to be water!

    2

    What colors do you typically see in a sunset? For the top half of the painting, use combinations of yellows, oranges, and maybe some pinks (mix some white into some red) and do your best to blend them together. The top half of the canvas will be the sky.

    3

    Now to start with the wave! I started with some yellow making diagonal brush strokes on the right side of the canvas toward the bottom corner. It doesn’t have to be perfect, many layers and several different colors will be added on top. Remember every wave is different, so do whatever feels natural to you!

    4

    Next, take some red and use your flat brush to add some dashed lines as waves on the left side of your canvas. Take some of the orange you mixed earlier and use it to blend into the yellow wave as best as you can, this way the wave will have more of an origin and won’t appear so jagged and random. Now, mix some blue with some yellow to make a greenish color and do the same type of brush strokes above the yellow wave to extend it. Add some green strokes to the yellow wave and some yellow strokes to the green wave to make it appear more blended together.

    5

    Next, shadows and highlights! Use some black paint and do the same dashed lines on the left side to add some dimensions to the background waves. Mix some red and white to make pink and add a little bit toward the bottom of the big wave. Mix a light yellow using yellow and white and add in highlights all over the wave.

    6

     Continue curving your wave around the canvas using blue and a lighter blue (mix some white into it). If it makes it easier, draw out where you want the wave to end, somewhere around the middle of the canvas.



    7

    Finish making the full shape of the wave using more blues, bring it so it ends in a point. If you need a darker blue, you can mix a tiny little bit of black into some blue. Continue adding highlights all throughout the wave, using either plain white or a very light blue.

    8

    Using your round brush, add sea foam and splashes by dabbing the very light blue you mixed or white down the edge of the wave on the left side. Sea foam and splashes should be very random, so if you’d like you can create them by flicking your brush as the canvas so it splatters randomly!

    9

    Now to add a surfer! Start by drawing a circle for the head, I’d recommend doing this part with pencil so you can easily erase if you need to. Make sure your wave is perfectly dry first!

    10

    Next for the body, think of it like four rectangles coming out of the circle: one diagonally on the right (the arm), one slightly bigger diagonally on the left (the torso), one coming out of the torso diagonally toward the right (the lower half of the body), and one small one coming out of the center of the lower half of the body, aiming diagonally toward the left (the other arm).

    11

     Add two leg shapes with feet coming out of the body. This is an impressionist-style painting, meaning it has an emphasis on color, light, and brush strokes rather than perfect details, so don’t worry if your person isn’t perfect. As long as you have the general shape down, it will read as a person!



    12

    Draw a pointed oval shape under the feet for the surfboard. Now it’s time to add color to the body! For my painting I used black so it would stand out, but you’re free to use whatever color you’d like!

    13

    Now add skin tones! To mix different skin tones, experiment using different colors to get the desired tone you want. If you want a lighter skin color, I would start with yellow and add a tiny bit of red then add white as needed to get it as light as you’d like. Add tiny bits at a time of blue for shadows. For darker skin tones, mix equal amounts of all three primary colors together (red, yellow, and blue), and you should end up with a relatively dark brown. Add whites to make it lighter, and add more blue or even tiny bits of black to make it a bit darker. Experiment using different ratios of each color to get the skin tone you want, if you want it a bit rosier, add some red. A bit cooler, add some blue. More of a golden brown, add yellow. Blues also tend to work with any skin tone to add more dynamic shadows.

    14

    Add some color for the hair (I used black again) and a color on the surfboard (I went with blue).

    15

    Add some more seafoam and splashes around the surfer so it looks more like they’re on the water. If you want more details, feel free to add more shadows and highlights on the surfboard, the clothing, wherever else you think it’s needed! Now you have a finished painting!

    Related Media

    Teens

    Sunset Surfer Painting II

    Instructor:  Lindsay Merwin
    This challenge is recommended for ages 13-18.

    Set-Up Supplies
    Plastic table cover
    Paper plates
    A large plastic cup or container with water
    Paper towels/hand wipes
    Wear clothes you don’t mind getting paint on.

    Art Bin Materials
    Canvas
    Acrylic paint set
    Brushes, round and flat

     
     

    1

    Start by mixing some yellow paint with some red to make orange. With your white canvas, paint the bottom half orange. It doesn’t have to be an exact straight line, this is going to be water!

    2

    What colors do you typically see in a sunset? For the top half of the painting, use combinations of yellows, oranges, and maybe some pinks (mix some white into some red) and do your best to blend them together. The top half of the canvas will be the sky.

    3

    Once your canvas is completely dry, take some black paint and add some scenery to the background as silhouettes. In my painting, I made a cliff with some palm trees and a pier. Try to keep everything as close to the left edge of the canvas as you can, as the wave you’ll be painting later will likely cover some of it.

    4

    Now to start with the wave! I started with some yellow making diagonal brush strokes on the right side of the canvas toward the bottom corner. It doesn’t have to be perfect, many layers and several different colors will be added on top. Remember every wave is different, so do whatever feels natural to you!

    5

     Next, take some red and use your flat brush to add some dashed lines as waves on the left side of your canvas. Take some of the orange you mixed earlier and use it to blend into the yellow wave as best as you can, this way the wave will have more of an origin and won’t appear so jagged and random. Now, mix some blue with some yellow to make a greenish color and do the same type of brush strokes above the yellow wave to extend it. Add some green strokes to the yellow wave and some yellow strokes to the green wave to make it appear more blended together.


    6

    Next, shadows and highlights! Use some black paint and do the same dashed lines on the left side to add some dimensions to the background waves. Mix some red and white to make pink and add a little bit toward the bottom of the big wave. Mix a light yellow using yellow and white and add in highlights all over the wave.

    7

    Continue curving your wave around the canvas using blue and a lighter blue (mix some white into it). If it makes it easier, draw out where you want the wave to end, somewhere around the middle of the canvas.

    8

    Finish making the full shape of the wave using more blues, bring it so it ends in a point. If you need a darker blue, you can mix a tiny little bit of black into some blue. Continue adding highlights all throughout the wave, using either plain white or a very light blue.

    9

    Using your round brush, add sea foam and splashes by dabbing the very light blue you mixed or white down the edge of the wave on the left side. Sea foam and splashes should be very random, so if you’d like you can create them by flicking your brush as the canvas so it splatters randomly!

    10

    Now to add a surfer! Start by drawing a circle for the head, I’d recommend doing this part with pencil so you can easily erase if you need to. Make sure your wave is perfectly dry first!

    11

    Next for the body, think of it like four rectangles coming out of the circle: one diagonally on the right (the arm), one slightly bigger one diagonally on the left (the torso), one coming out of the torso diagonally toward the right (the lower half of the body), and one small one coming out of the center of the lower half of the body, aiming diagonally toward the left (the other arm).

    12

    Add two leg shapes with feet coming out of the body. This is an impressionist-style painting, meaning it has an emphasis on color, light, and brush strokes rather than perfect details, so don’t worry if your person isn’t perfect. As long as you have the general shape down, it will read as a person!

    13

    Draw a pointed oval shape under the feet for the surfboard. Now it’s time to add color to the body! For my painting I used black so it would stand out, but you’re free to use whatever color you’d like!

    14

    Now add skin tones! To mix different skin tones, experiment using different colors to get the desired tone you want. If you want a lighter skin color, I would start with yellow and add a tiny bit of red then add white as needed to get it as light as you’d like. Add tiny bits at a time of blue for shadows. For darker skin tones, mix equal amounts of all three primary colors together (red, yellow, and blue), and you should end up with a relatively dark brown. Add whites to make it lighter, and add more blue or even tiny bits of black to make it a bit darker. Experiment using different ratios of each color to get the skin tone you want, if you want it a bit rosier, add some red. A bit cooler, add some blue. More of a golden brown, add yellow. Blues also tend to work with any skin tone to add more dynamic shadows. 

    15

    Add some color for the hair (I used black again) and a color on the surfboard (I went with blue).
    16.  Add some more seafoam and splashes around the surfer so it looks more like they’re on the water. If you want more details, feel free to add more shadows and highlights on the surfboard, the clothing, wherever else you think it’s needed! Now you have a finished painting!
     

    Related Media

    Coming Up Next

    • Lesson #3 | July 09 | Photography

    • Lesson #4 | July 16 | Sculpture

    • Lesson #5 | July 23 | Mixed Media